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Download Android Studio 3.1 – New DEX Compiler, Updates to Lint, Android Profilers

Developers can now download Android Studio 3.1 on their computers as Google has released the new build to the stable channel. A month back, we saw Google unveil Android Studio 3.1 Beta which came with important improvements and new features. As the company has completed its testing, the Android Studio 3.1 makes it way to the Stable channel, which means, every user can update to it without having losing current projects. The changes in this newer version are quite large in number, highlights being: improvements with Kotlin, better debugging tools and emulator improvements. Download Android Studio 3.1 directly or update your current installation to use all the new features.

The 3.0 milestone was hit just a few months back and here we have Google further perfecting the overall experience. New changes include a C++ profiler which allows you to test out the performance of your app, faster boot times for emulator and also, support for frame-less mode which allows you to test your app on a modern 18:9 display along with display cutout (Notch). We will be discussing the various new features in depth right ahead.

Download Android Studio 3.1

Android Studio 3.1 – Features:

Here we have attached the highlight features that new Android Studio 3.1 brings. You can immediately utilize all of them once you complete the installation procedure.

  • New DEX compiler
    • By default, Android Studio 3.1 uses a new DEX compiler called D8, which was announced on the Android Developers Blog.
    • DEX compilation is the process of transforming .class bytecode into .dex bytecode for the Android Runtime (or Dalvik, for older versions of Android). Compared to the current compiler, called DX, D8 compiles faster and outputs smaller DEX files, all while having the same or better app runtime performance.
  • Updates to the Android Profilers
    Depending on which Preview version you’re using, Android Studio 3.1 includes the following updates to the Android Profilers.

    • Sample native processes with CPU Profiler
      • The CPU Profiler now includes a default configuration to record sampled traces of your app’s native threads. You can use this configuration by deploying your app to a device running Android 8.0 (API level 26) or higher and then selecting Sampled (Native) from the CPU profiler’s recording configurations dropdown menu. After that, record and inspect a trace as you normally would.
    • Remember, you can change default settings, such as the sampling interval, by creating a recording configuration. To switch back to tracing your Java threads, select either a Sampled (Java) or Instrumented (Java) configuration.
  • Filter CPU trace and memory allocation results
    • When using Android Studio 3.1 Canary 6 or higher, the CPU Profiler and Memory Profiler include a search feature that allows you to filter results from recording a method trace, memory allocations, or heap dump.
  • Updates to Lint
    • When you run lint from the command line, lint now also analyzes your Kotlin classes.
  • Updates to Emulator
    • Quick Boot allows you to resume your Android Emulator session in under 6 seconds. Slow start time on the Android Emulator was a major pain point we heard from you and Quick Boot solves this issue. Like a physical Android device, the emulator must perform an initial cold boot, but subsequent starts are fast. The feature is enabled by default for all Android Virtual Devices. Additionally, in this release, you have finer grain controls of when to use Quick Boot and the ability to save the quick boot state on demand under the emulator settings page.

You can also watch the official video highlighting all the changes in Android Studio 3.1:

Download Android Studio 3.1:

You can follow the given official link to download Android Studio 3.1:

Need help with the installation of Android Studio? We have a complete tutorial that you can read: How to Set Up Android Studio on Computer.

Android Studio 3.1 – System Requirements

These are the system requirements your computer should meet in order to run Android Studio 3.1. We have listed system requirements according to each desktop Operating System.

Android Studio on Windows

  • Microsoft® Windows® 7/8/10 (32- or 64-bit)
  • 3 GB RAM minimum, 8 GB RAM recommended; plus 1 GB for the Android Emulator
  • 2 GB of available disk space minimum,
    4 GB Recommended (500 MB for IDE + 1.5 GB for Android SDK and emulator system image)
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution
  • For accelerated emulator: Intel® processor with support for Intel® VT-x, Intel® EM64T (Intel® 64), and Execute Disable (XD) Bit functionality

Android Studio on Mac

  • Mac® OS X® 10.10 (Yosemite) or higher, up to 10.12 (macOS Sierra)
  • 3 GB RAM minimum, 8 GB RAM recommended; plus 1 GB for the Android Emulator
  • 2 GB of available disk space minimum,
    4 GB Recommended (500 MB for IDE + 1.5 GB for Android SDK and emulator system image)
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution

Android Studio on Linux

  • GNOME or KDE desktopTested on Ubuntu® 14.04 LTS, Trusty Tahr (64-bit distribution capable of running 32-bit applications)
  • 64-bit distribution capable of running 32-bit applications
  • GNU C Library (glibc) 2.19 or later
  • 3 GB RAM minimum, 8 GB RAM recommended; plus 1 GB for the Android Emulator
  • 2 GB of available disk space minimum,
    4 GB Recommended (500 MB for IDE + 1.5 GB for Android SDK and emulator system image)
  • 1280 x 800 minimum screen resolution
  • For accelerated emulator: Intel® processor with support for Intel® VT-x, Intel® EM64T (Intel® 64), and Execute Disable (XD) Bit functionality, or AMD processor with support for AMD Virtualization™ (AMD-V™)

If you are looking to install Android 8.0 Oreo on your computer, read: How to Set Up Android 8.0 Oreo on Android Studio.

[Source: Android Developer Website]